Tanglin's History of Community Resilience | Change & Continuity

Tanglin's History of Community Resilience | Change & Continuity
Tanglin's History of Community Resilience | Change & Continuity

Our school community has shown remarkable resilience over the past weeks, but this isn't the first time we've faced such challenges. Did you know there were two wartime hiatuses in our 95-year history?

Just under 80 years ago, Tanglin's day school in Singapore and its boarding school in the Cameron Highlands were closed during WWII. What's more, in 1943 our headmistress, Anne Griffith-Jones, was interned in Changi Prison by the occupying forces. In the course of her imprisonment, Miss Griff channelled her dedication to education closer to 'home' by establishing a school for the internees.

After the war, Tanglin flourished again under Miss Griff's leadership. But during the Malayan Emergency (1948-1960) the Singapore campus was once more closed to protect the community, after the school was surrounded by armed forces. This time, most of the staff and students relocated to premises in Holland and Orange Grove Roads.

So everything changes, yet some things stay very much the same - our community remains as adaptable, resourceful and purposeful as ever!